Wool Reputable

“Integrity trust and transparency are the core values that create long lasting partnerships.” That’s part of a tweet paying tribute to our very valuable relationship we have with the Society of British International Design or SBID.

It was a reply to a quote by Prince William “One thing that I think we all value about New Zealand is the integrity of its institutions”

You cannot under-value integrity, and it is getting more valuable. The interior designers that we are working with are curious about where things come from and who made them. The story of the product is almost as important as form and function.

Trust comes from acting with integrity, consistently over time.   Once word gets out you have a reputation and that leads to new business opportunities.

Earn your reputation by being reputable; build a product with a real story.

Language

We are all experts at something, and we all have something to say.  Recently I was listening, for a change, and actually learnt something.  Well, I was reminded of something.

When you talk, speak in the language of your audience.  Wool people talk in textile terminology, which is fine if you talk to a weaver, but really dumb when you talk to a retailer.

When an IT consultant talks in jargon, do we trust her or wonder if we are going to be ripped off?   When a mechanic sucks air through his teeth and talks about machine parts we prepare ourselves for a shock.

I was listening to Jim Hanna of Starbucks recently and he could not emphasize enough how talking Business language to business people had made the difference in the internal battle to sell sustainability within Starbucks.

Talking about saving trees does not make an accountant happy, but talking about making more profit by improving staff retention, reducing energy costs and streamlining value chains – that’s gets the bean counters on board and the HR department and the store designers…

Language is too important to trust to the linguists.  Lets keep it simple and build some trust.

Jargon

image stolen form random internet site – sorry

Care Statement

According to sustainablebrands.com over 50% of global consumers are willing to pay more for socially responsible products.

This varies according to markets demographics, with European consumers being more skeptical than Asian consumers.  But the numbers are staggering.  People really do care about the integrity and the impact of what they purchase, at least half of them do anyway.

As with everything it’s about building trust.  People love brands that they trust and they will show loyalty and forgiveness.  Brands that consistently deliver a feel good experience will win every time.

Buying natural products supports rural farming communities, buying synthetic products supports the oil industry.  Maybe if people thought about this they would use more wool?

What we have to do is pull heart-strings.  It’s our job to build trust and to deliver integrity.  With real stories that resonate with the half of consumers who care.

Perhaps we need to stop making sustainability statements on corporate websites? No one cares what your carbon footprint is, that was last centuries obsession.  Make a care statement instead, but make it real.

More information on the Sustainable Brands survey is here

Gratuitous Heartstring Picture.

Gratuitous Heart-string Picture.